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Poster:fieldsofcrystal
Date:2013-05-06 04:49
Subject:Eh pá já me esqueci...
Security:Public

Penso mesmo que o pior do pior nem é o facebook, nem os estúpidos updates de status. Pior é mesmo termos um blogue onde podemos merdar à vontade, pois ninguém vai ler nem julgar e quem vier é indiferente e até pode tornar-se uma pessoa interessante. É que, chamem-me prepotente, quem vier ler isto é porque não tem muito mais que fazer, sabe falar português e perceber os erros que dou porque tenho sono. Imaginemos isto como um vlog, excepto sem aquelas figuras ridículas à frente de um computador. Há alguém que veja vlogs ou podcasts e que não veja as notícias do dia, a nível de cultura (o resto costuma ser igual a folhear merda)? Não é assustador pensar nessa ideia? Que alguém faz um dress to impress para a webcam só para falar sobre o nariz torto, a nova cor de cabelo, conselhos sobre unhas de gel, ou sobre como criar massa muscular mais rapidamente, entre muitas outras coisas como acabar relações, gritar a plenos pulmões com as amigas ou namorados, gozar com os outros... Caramba, isto é a internet com uma equação absolutamente insana. Morra, pim.

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Poster:souldreamsawake
Date:2012-01-24 10:47
Subject:United Kingdom Archives Program Conundrum
Security:Public

Hello!
I was wondering if any of you knew if US employers would frown on a United States citizen who completed her archives & records management masters program abroad in the United Kingdom (University College London) instead of the United States? Would it make it very difficult to get a job back in the United States (I would present my transcript, show the classes I have taken, etc).
I also have a lot of volunteer and internship experience in archives and records management if that helps.

Conversely, is it very difficult for an American with a degree from UCL to get a job in the UK dealing in archives & records management after graduation? I know visas are difficult to come by.

Just trying to figure out my options. Any advice or information would be MUCH appreciated.
Have a lovely day.

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Poster:lostarkeo
Date:2012-01-17 17:57
Subject:Film Preservation
Security:Public

Hi all! I have a question regarding film preservation schools on the east coast. The two I'm aware of include NYU Master’s Degree Program in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation, and George Eastman House House L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film and Video Preservation. Both are pretty pricey...around the same tuition I paid for my undergrad.

I currently have a masters in Library Science from Queens College with a certificate in archives, but I have a deep desire to work in film preservation. I chose the path of an MLS because I wanted librarianship to be something to fall back on, and actually it worked out when I really couldn't find jobs in the archive field following graduation last June. I'm currently a reference and instruction librarian at a small college.

I feel like my question is silly because I know the answer is yes, but I'd like to hear your input. My question is (for any film archivists in the community or anyone who may know the answer), do you recommend a film preservation degree? Would my certificate in archives (and additional readings I do to keep up with the field on the side) be enough? I guess it would depend on the job description, right? Sigh....

I just got into the habit of paying back loans and it would break my heart to take out another large chunk, haha! Perhaps there are alternatives that I'm not seeing. Anyway, thanks in advance!

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Poster:beadylady
Date:2011-10-20 14:33
Subject:archives/museum help
Security:Public

Hi--Let me start out by saying I am not an archivist, librarian or historian. However, I have many years of office experience and am good at organizing files.

And so... I'm volunteering at a small historical society museum on a shoestring budget. The place is in chaos, mostly because they've had a lot of staff turnover during the years. The filing system is a nightmare. They've got files labeled "Correspondence" that go back to the 1970s, instead of having the letters filed in the subject files.

There are "Accession" files, "Loaned Objects" files, "Objects in collection" files (though not for every item).

Luckily, the museum owns Past Perfect and a lot of the original accession cards/handwritten records have been transferred into the program.

I have a few questions on reorganizing the physical files (aside from tossing a lot of the stuff). Also, on keeping an inventory for the gift shop. I believe they've got Excel and Access too.

Does anyone have a good model for a filing system? I went to the National Archives site and it's overwhelming.

Also, if your museum has a gift shop, how do you keep track of purchases etc.?

The task seems to be a many-headed Hydra...Sigh...

Thank you!


Xposted to libraryschool and library_grrrls

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Poster:glorious_clio
Date:2011-09-12 20:54
Subject:study/work abroad?
Security:Public
Mood: busy

Hello, 

I have a quick question.  I am a current MLIS student on an archives track, and today my advisor suggested I study or work abroad for a few weeks/a semester.  I was wondering if anyone had any idea of where to begin looking for programs/projects?  I'd especially love to go to the UK (having already studied abroad and quite comfortable with the country(ies) already).  

Really, any suggestions would be helpful!  

Thanks for your time!  

xoxo

5 comments | post a comment



Poster:souldreamsawake
Date:2011-06-07 21:27
Subject:Asthma and Archives
Security:Public

Hello!
I am a library science student looking to specialize in archives. I have just one problem: I have asthma. When I work with archival materials in my internship I don't usually have a big problem (so far), but I do have occasionally bad flare ups.

 My health is obviously first and foremost my number one priority, but this is something I love doing and I just don't want to give it up if I don't have to. I didn't know if any of you out there has a similar problem...if so, have you found it to be an obstacle to your career as an archivist?

Any thoughts on this are welcome and appreciated.

5 comments | post a comment



Poster:lostarkeo
Date:2011-06-03 08:52
Subject:ACA Exam?
Security:Public

Hi! I have certificate of archives and records management from Queens College (along with my MLS degree). I just recently found out about the ACA (The Academy of Certified Archivists) exam. Is it necessary for applying to jobs? Or is that something that is often pursued once you have years of experience on the field? I'm somewhat confused. Anyone can help?

EDIT: I think I found my answer in the ACA Handbook. In order to qualify for the exam, there are four options (two of which require a master's degree with a concentration in archives and a few years of professional archival experience). 

So just in case anyone was curious, check out the handbook on their website. :)

2 comments | post a comment



Poster:millionbubbles
Date:2011-05-16 02:08
Subject:Archivist without grad school
Security:Public
Mood: curious

Hi everyone, glad to have found this community. I am just curious, is it even possible to find an archive job without grad school? I'm currently just finished my 2nd year of undergrad and I'm almost 28 years old. I would really rather not have to spend more time in school after undergrad. But are the prospects of finding a job in archives even possible without a graduate degree? Are there any steps a person could take to getting a career in this field through ways other than graduate school?

Also any reccomendations for good grad schools in Canada (if I have to take this route). I know there is a Masters of Archival Studies at UBC. Are there any other schools that offer a program like this?

Thanks.

7 comments | post a comment



Poster:nefariousni
Date:2011-01-09 11:03
Subject:Archives, Records Management Connection
Security:Public

Hi all,

I am currently getting my MLIS, and I have been working a paid records management internship for a while. By the time it is over, I will have one year's experience. I wasn't expecting to fall into RM, but I feel that the experience has been mostly positive. However, I would much rather work at an archives or museum eventually.

As a records management intern, I work more with current records and typically focus more on the importance of disposal and legality than long-term care and historical context.

I'm wondering, though, if people think of RM as being similar to archives.  My boss actually used to work as an archivist, but I don't know if the transition from RM to archives is as easy. Any ideas?

Thank you!

5 comments | post a comment



Poster:novanglus
Date:2010-12-31 19:36
Subject:Mama, they took my Kodachrome away
Security:Public

"For Kodachrome Fans, Road Ends at Photo Lab in Kansas"

And why post this on the Archivists list? Kodachrome was famous and distinctive among color films in setting a standard for colorfastness and permanence. Ektachrome and other varieties were cheap and easy, but within a few years they would be substantially washed out. But a Kodachrome slide, kept in the dark in an archival sleeve, would be as bright as the day it was processed, even after 50 years.

Ye Archivists: gather up the world's remaining Kodachromes and care for them well. They will determine how much of the 20th century will look for all time to come.

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Poster:just_arty
Date:2010-01-23 16:52
Subject:Feedback Appreciated
Security:Public

Please do forgive me if this post is inappropriate for this community.

First, a bit of a background: I'm a recent graduate in the archives track who wants to enter the Archives field, but I'm currently having a difficult time doing so due to my small amount of experience. Seeking advice, I chatted with some people at a conference, and one of them suggested starting a blog, and posting my pictures via say, Flickr, to show that I have an understanding of technology and what is involved with digital photographs, files, and whatnot. Of course, I liked the idea, since I have a personal project: organizing and preparing my digital photographs for "long-term" storage (Can be seen here ).

Now, I've been antagonizing over the best possible name for the blog. After doing a bit of brainstorming and deleting the names I did not care for, I've managed to narrow down my list of choices. Now I'd like to hear feedback on which you think will be best? Personally, I'm leaning towards "Exploring Deaf Archivist," because well, 1) I am deaf, 2) I plan/want to be an archivist and 3) I'm still learning (a lot).

Here are the names I'm debating on:
Archivist-in-Training
Curious Deaf Archivist
Danger: Archivist Exploring
Exploring Deaf Archivist
The Newbie Archivist


To help me figure out and narrow down my choices, I contemplated about what I want my blog to be about and its focus. Here is what I came up with:

The blog will be a place to record my thoughts, discoveries and personal projects that will be related to the Archival field. For one, I plan to record my thoughts and discoveries as I work on my first personal project: organizing and preparing my digital photographs for long-term storage and for Internet usage. Additionally, I will be reading articles and blog entries, as well as other readings as I keep track of current events and study for my ACA examination, and the blog will be a place to record my thoughts and reactions. In a sense, I am continuing my exploration of the archival field after having graduated, for my learning experiences will never end, and what better place than a blog to record such thoughts?

Let me know what you think! Many thanks! :-)

3 comments | post a comment



Poster:stomp_the_floor
Date:2009-11-17 20:34
Subject:Senate motion against closure of National Archives
Security:Public

Greens Senator For Tasmania, Bob Brown, put a motion to the senate this afternoon calling on the Government to reexamine the closure of the National Archives offices in Darwin, Hobart and Adelaide and it was agreed. Which is basically a pretty small victory but at least its a start.

It also makes me think that we can win this not only because we have some support but also because the money involved is so paltry. In all seriousness closing the three offices plus some efficiency measures in Canberra will save a grand total of less then $5 million over three years. Basically in the scheme of things its bugger all and the Government should be able to find the money somewhere.

They could start by making the Defence Force keep better track of its stuff so they can cut back on the $71 million A DAY that it needs. I'll even help them count their Rocket Launchers properly to help out.



x posted from my Journal

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Poster:missmilky
Date:2009-11-16 12:04
Subject:Closure of the National Archives of Australia Darwin, Adelaide and Hobart offices
Security:Public

The Darwin, Adelaide and Hobart offices are being closed down over the next three years. As well as staff cuts this will also take away local access to residents in those states. A lot of records are available online on the NAA website and clients can contact the archives to have copies of records sent to them, however there are instances where people need to get hold of records that day be it for passport applications, proof of ID or social security benefits.

Below is a copy of a letter submitted to the ASA listserv by one of the staff at Wollongong University. He has granted people rights to use the text of the letter for themselves. If you are concerned about this downsizing then please send a print copy of the letter or similar to your local Federal member.

"> Dear
>
> It has come to my attention that your government is closing the Darwin, Adelaide and Hobart offices of the National Archives of Australia.
>
> I would ask that you request the Minister responsible, Senator Ludwig, to put an immediate freeze on these closures.
>
> It is vital that all Australians have access to the collections of the NAA.
>
> The closure of these offices will severely impact upon such access.
>
> The closure of the Darwin office, in particular, will impact upon Indigenous Australians seeking to use the Archives collections.
>
> These offices must remain open, irregardless of the issue of internet access.
>
> The process of accessing and using archival material is a complex one - I know, I am a professional archivist and researcher.
>
> Trained archival staff are needed on hand to assist with this. They are also required to source material and ensure that aspects of the historic record of our nation are preserved and made accessible.
>
> I look forward to your support in this matter.
>
> All the best."

http://www.cpsu.org.au/agency/news/15754.html

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Poster:serendipitynsa
Date:2009-05-23 18:38
Subject:
Security:Public

Thank you so much for your replies to my last question, they were really helpful!
Now I have another question, going in the opposite direction:
Do you think a general library degree with a certificate in archival management (or something to that effect) would be viewed as well, worse, or better than a library degree with an archives specialization?
Thanks!

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Poster:serendipitynsa
Date:2009-05-15 10:01
Subject:Archive schools?
Security:Public

Hey all,
I'm looking into graduate school options, and wondering if anyone can point me toward a resource, or share their knowledge/opinion, on what are good schools for archival studies that focus on rare books and documents archives/preservation, rather than the archiving of current materials.
US primarily, but if the best option is in the UK or Canada I'd consider it.
Thanks.

13 comments | post a comment



Poster:ringrrl416
Date:2009-04-10 12:56
Subject:Attention New York Archivists
Security:Public

New York Archives Conference Scholarships
Application deadline: April 24, 2009

The New York Archives Conference annual meeting will be held June 3-5, 2009, at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, NY. Presentations on topics including archives security, remodeling, ethics, collection development, copyright, working with development officers, managing e-mail and Web records, Web 2.0 applications, strategic planning, AV digitization, and educational use of records, will consider current standards and their archival applications. The scholarship application form can be found at <http://www.nyarchivists.org/>http://www.nyarchivists.org/ and the program will soon be available in the same location.

rest of announcement under cutCollapse )

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Poster:b_cavis
Date:2009-02-23 20:17
Subject:Appraisal failures
Security:Public

Hi everyone,

I'm giving a presentation on archive appraisal, and was hoping you guys could give me a hand with something.

I'm going to tilt the discussion towards proving how subjective and difficult appraisal actually is, and to do so I wanted to talk about some mistakes/failures of appraisal in the past (ie-- "Oh this is useless, throw it away/don't take it" and then it turns out to be of vital significance).

Can anyone help me with some examples of (in)famous appraisal flubs? I've found the Heiner case (http://www.caldeson.com/RIMOS/summary.html) but I can't seem to locate any others.

Thank you from a grateful MLIS student!

2 comments | post a comment



Poster:chiv
Date:2009-02-11 22:21
Subject:What would you look for in a personal statement?
Security:Public

I'm a British undergraduate with an application in progress for a place on an archiving course and I've just been asked to supply a personal statement.
I wonder if anyone in this group would be able to provide any advice onwhat aproach to take when writing one suitable for a university application; what you would especially mention and, probably more importantly, what not to include.

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Poster:derangedescribe
Date:2008-11-16 15:10
Subject:webcomic about archives
Security:Public

I looked all over the internet and couldn't find a webcomic about archives, so I decided to start one. It's called Derangement and Description. If you like it, please share it with your archives-loving friends!

~Dee Dee

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Poster:druganaut
Date:2008-10-15 21:33
Subject:Archive MA's in the UK
Security:Public

Hey has anyone here done an Archive Studies course in the UK? Im thinking of doing the MSC in Glasgow or the MA at UCL. I currently live in London so would like to stay here but I've heard the UCL course is a bit old fashioned whereas the glasgow course has so much emphasis on new technology/digital archiving. Any advice? Also did anyone get funding?

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